The Fund For Animals

Media Contact

Rodi Rosensweig
The Fund for Animals
RRosensweig@humanesociety.org
(203) 270 - 8929

History

The Fund for Animals was founded in 1967 by prominent author and animal advocate Cleveland Amory.

Since then, The Fund for Animals has spearheaded significant events in the history of the animal protection movement by employing national advocacy campaigns, rescue operations and operating a network of world-famous animal care facilities like our Cleveland Amory Black Beauty Ranch.

The Fund for Animals' historic victories have saved thousands of animals from cruelty and suffering.

In 2005, The Fund for Animals and The Humane Society of the United States joined together to form an unprecedented partnership for animals. Since then, The Fund for Animals has expanded its efforts to protect animals from cruelty and provide for their veterinary, sanctuary, and rehabilitative needs at several direct animal care facilities. With the help of Animal Protection Litigation, The Fund has won legal actions to protect endangered species and prevent inhumane hunting and trapping practices.

The Fund for Animals' direct animal care operations provide veterinary treatment for thousands of animals year-round, while training volunteers and supporting their local communities.

  • The Cleveland Amory Black Beauty Ranch, is the flagship legacy of author and The Fund for Animals Founder, Cleveland Amory. This 1,400-acre refuge in the rolling hills of east Texas, provides permanent sanctuary for over 800 rescued animals. With over 40 species—ranging from monkeys and camels to horses and tigers—this world-renowned facility is the largest and most diverse of its kind. The Sanctuary is also home to the Doris Day Equine Center which focuses on developing optimum programs to elevate the public perception of horses rescued from cruelty and neglect. In addition to our hands-on rescue and rehabilitation, we serve as a resource and support system to rescue centers around the country through our unique equine training program.
  • Duchess Sanctuary was established in 2008 as a safe haven for formerly abused, abandoned and neglected horses. Situated on 1,120 acres outside of the charming town of Oakland, Oregon, it offers permanent sanctuary to more than 180 equines. Much of the herd was rescued from the Pregnant Mare Urine (PMU) industry, while other residents were rescued from public lands, auctions, feedlots and other dangerous situations.
  • Rural Area Veterinary Services (RAVS) provides free veterinary medical and surgical care to communities where animal health care is unavailable, with a primary focus on helping Native American communities across the western U.S. RAVS’ MASH-style mobile field clinics provide critical veterinary services, including spay/neuter surgeries, emergency and preventative care, at no cost to pet owners or their communities. The program helps thousands of families every year by keeping pets healthy and in their homes. RAVS provides one-of-a-kind field work opportunities for veterinary professionals, students and other volunteers. Each year, more than 350 volunteers join RAVS field teams to provide essential medical care to more than 8,000 animals who would otherwise likely go untreated. Over the past 15 years, more than 6,000 veterinary students and veterinary professionals have contributed their time to help more than 115,000 animals.